Archivi

Meteors showers and sky news


This photograph was produced by European Southern Observatory (ESO).

 

From Sky & Telescope web site
Meteor showers in 2017

 

 

 

 

A slender Moon is an beautiful and inspiring sight. December and January offer several opportunities to see these exceptional crescents. \nThe post What’s the Thinnest Crescent Moon You Can See? appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
Mark the date: December 13th. That\'s the night the Geminid meteor shower peaks. Highlighted by the return of its parent asteroid 3200 Phaethon, this year\'s show promises to be one of the best ever.\nThe post Fantastic Year for Geminid Meteor Shower appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
As you\'ll hear in December\'s astronomy podcast, early risers are treated with views of Jupiter (obvious), Mars (not as easy), and Mercury (timing is everything!).\nThe post Tour December’s Sky: See 3 Planets at Dawn appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
The parent asteroid of next month\'s Geminid meteor shower, 3200 Phaethon, is about to make a historically close flyby. Get ready to watch it race across the sky.\nThe post Asteroid 3200 Phaethon: Geminid Parent at Its Closest and Brightest! appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
With exoplanet Ross 128b in the news, we pay a visit to the star that sustains this potentially habitable exoplanet. \nThe post Invite Ross 128 Over This Thanksgiving appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
Venus bids farewell at dawn, but not before a close encounter with returning Jupiter.\nThe post An Exquisite Venus–Jupiter Conjunction appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
By watching a star’s disappearance, astronomers learned about the state of the ultrathin atmosphere of Triton, Neptune\'s largest moon. \nThe post Results from October’s Triton Cover-Up appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
Just discovered, Comet Heinze (C/2017 T) will zoom by Earth in January and may just show up in your binoculars.\nThe post Comet Heinze (C/2017 T1): A Binocular Comet for the New Year? appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
The Moon occults two 1st-magnitude stars for much of North America just six days apart. The first event happens mostly in early-evening darkness, the second in broad daylight — an extra challenge for the adventurous.\nThe post November Occultations of Aldebaran & Regulus appeared first on Sky & Telescope.
As you\'ll hear in this month\'s astronomy podcast, Venus and Jupiter are putting on quite a show low in the east before dawn.\nThe post Tour November’s Sky: Predawn Planets appeared first on Sky & Telescope.